The Repulsor


PRICE: $ 2000.00 + five dollars per pound of the vehicle's total weight.
SPACE: 1/5 of the vehicle's spaces, rounding down.
WEIGHT: 100 pounds per space
CHARGE: 10 PU per shot per space
RANGE: 50 feet

Repulsors are an excellent investment, if you can afford them. They can be used as an emergency brake, a booster, or a weapon against lighter vehicles. Pity the motorcyclist who gets broadsided by a ten-wheeler's repulsors!

Repulsors harness magnetic force and gravity effects in a broad energy beam that repels matter. While this is an expensive and impractical way of pushing against something, the versatility of the repulsor makes it handy to have in certain contexts. The 'wake' of a repulsor beam makes it impossible for the vehicle who fired it to make an accurate shot from that facing for the next 2 rounds (+1D to all shots). Firing a repulsor is a D1 hazard.

When used as an emergency brake (pushing against a wall or heavy stationary object in order to avoid a head-on collision), the repulsor allows triple normal deceleration, with no additional tire wear but one point of damage to the facing armour (or damage test, in the case of metal armour) per space per turn.

When used as a booster (same circumstances), the repulsor allows double normal acceleration for the turn until the anchor object is out of range.

Stationary target behavior

When fired at a movable object from a vehicle that is at least 10 times the target's weight, the vehicle does not decelerate and the object accelerates to match the vehicle's speed in two turns.

When fired at a movable object from a vehicle that is at least 3 times the target's weight, the vehicle decelerates by 10 mph/turn and the target accelerates to match the vehicle's speed by 15 mph/turn.

When fired at a movable object that is less than the vehicle's weight but more than one-third the vehicle's weight, the vehicle decelerates by 10 mph/turn and the target accelerates to match the vehicle's speed by 10 mph/turn.

When fired at a movable object that is greater than the vehicle's weight but less than twice the vehicle's weight, the vehicle decelerates by 15 mph/turn and the target accelerates by 5mph/turn to match the vehicle's speed.

When fired at a movable object that is greater than twice the vehicle's weight, treat it as an emergency brake.

Mobile target behavior

In all cases, deceleration/acceleration continues until the vehicles meet some speed equilibrium (probably a halt, if the vehicles are moving towards each other).

If the target is less than one tenth the vehicle's weight and moving in the same direction, then the vehicle does not decelerate and the object matches the vehicle's speed at the end of the turn.
If an object of that same weight is moving in the opposite direction, it suffers a D1 hazard (D2 for motorcycles) and decelerates at 30 mph/turn.
If the object is moving perpendicular to the vehicle, it suffers a D3 hazard (D4 for motorcycles) and will probably go into a spin.

If the target is less than one third the vehicle's weight but more than one tenth the weight, and moving in the same direction, then the vehicle decelerates by 5 mph per turn and the target accelerates to match the vehicle's speed by 10 mph/turn.
If an object of the same weight is moving in the opposite direction, it suffers a D1 hazard (D2 for bikes) and decelerates at 20 mph/turn. The vehicle decelerates at 10 mph/turn.
If the object is moving perpendicular to the vehicle, it suffers a D2 hazard (D3 for bikes) and will probably go into a spin. The vehicle decelerates by 5 mph.

If the object is less than the vehicle's weight but more than one third the weight, and moving in the same direction, then the vehicle decelerates by 5 mph/turn and the target accelerates by 5mph/turn.
If an object of the same weight is moving in the opposite direction, (a D1 hazard for bikes) it decelerates at 15mph/turn. The vehicle decelerates at 10 mph/turn.
If the object is moving perpendicular to the vehicle, it suffers a D1 hazard (D2 for bikes). The vehicle decelerates by 5 mph.

If the object is more than the vehicle's weight but less than twice the weight, and is moving in the same direction, the vehicle decelerates by 5 mph/turn until it matches the target's speed.
If the object is moving in the opposite direction, both of them suffer a D1 hazard and decelerate by 15 mph/turn.
If the object is moving perpendicular to the vehicle, both suffer a D1 hazard and the vehicle decelerates by 5 mph.

If the object is more than twice the vehicle's weight, treat it as an emergency brake.



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